QUEER PULP

Queer Pulp: Perverted Passions from the Golden Age of the PaperbackQueer Pulp: Perverted Passions from the Golden Age of the Paperback by Susan Stryker
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

QUEER PULP – The title says it all. Queer Pulp: Perverted Passions from the Golden Age of the Paperback, by Susan Stryker, explores a wide range of the mid-century mass-market paperback. However, the concept of the gay lesbian ‘sleaze’ novel -prior to 1965 -was all about titillation not pornography; by today’s standards. In that light, the title is a bit misleading, because the book is an overview of the golden age of the paperback novel. At a time when that format was the chief literary form. Pulps had covers designed to-be-seen; to convey crime, alternative lifestyles, gender issues, drug abuse and laid the foundations for the sexual revolution.

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NO BOUNDARIES RADIO INTERVIEW

NO BOUNDARIES RADIO INTERVIEW – Listen to Chad Schimke on No Boundaries Radio Show (noboundariesradioshow.com). The date is Wednesday 8-22-12 and the time is 7 PM Eastern. Or, look up the podcast at a later date. The interview includes a giveaway contest for a chance to win one of his four titles. He is the author of Picker, Pieces, Walker and Weirder; in collaboration with images by artist Solis (heartofsolis.com). Find Chad on his blog (chadschimke.blogspot.com) for postings on occult paranormal novels, crime dramas, art installations and city life in San Francisco.


#Radio #ChadSchimke #SanFrancisco #SocialMedia #AmWriting #Horror #Thriller

THE CITY AND THE PILLAR

The City and the PillarThe City and the Pillar by Gore Vidal
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

THE CITY AND THE PILLAR – The author’s death -in 2012 at the age of 86 – garnered as much press for his literary achievements as for his celebrity. Reference a nasty debate with William F. Buckley Jr. on live television (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYymnx…). Where Buckley is referred to as a ‘crypto-Nazi’ and Vidal is referred to as a ‘queer’. The City and the Pillar by Gore Vidal broke new literary ground, as the first book with an unapologetic gay male character, who isn’t full of self-loathing and doesn’t die of suicide at the end.

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