San Francisco Timelapse Vid Clip

Paradise x SF from Maniego Media on Vimeo.

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MEXICAN MUSEUM

MEXICAN MUSEUM – This post is a snippet of a longer article take from the Chronicle, see below for the link to the full article. San Francisco’s Mexican Museum is currently located at Fort Mason Center. A new building is in the planning stages, to be located in Yerba Buena, near the SFMOMA and the Jewish Museum. Construction on the multi-million project will begin as soon as late 2014. The collection contains pre-conquest, colonial, folk, Mexican/ Chicano as well as contemporary art. The picture depicts the proposed plan for the new building.

http://www.sfgate.com/art/article/Mexican-Museum-s-new-home-closer-to-reality-4742302.php

#ChadSchimke  #SanFrancisco  #ArtGallery #SFMoma  #VisualAid  #Picasso  #Haring  #Koons  #Warhol  #Calder  #Lichtenstein  #ReclaimedRoom  #Gallery1044  #LowerPolkArtWalk  #BayBridge #CityArtGallery #Bansky #SirronNorris #Solis

REVIEW OF PIECES BY MARTYN STRATTEN

REVIEW OF PIECES BY MARTYN STRATTEN – “Worlds collide in this colourful and gripping paranormal adventure. Mammon, in all its vulgarity and rampant materialism clash with dark spirits, witchcraft and metaphysics. A handsome playboy gambler, newly married to Monroe-style buxom blonde, transmogrifies throughout this roller-coaster of a tale. The author develops his characters skilfully as the action progresses. A plethora of supporting characters backlight an artist, an actor, a writer and a thief. Darkness pursues the protagonists and mayhem ensues.  Scenic locations including Lake Tahoe, Wichita, Manhattan and Death Valley provide a panoramic backdrop to the helta skelta shenanigans. An excellent pace, great characterisation and a sense of the supernatural at play combine to produce this impressive page-turner.

ABLE, BAKER, CHARLIE, DOG

ABLE, BAKER, CHARLIE, DOG – This short story is part of a larger work by the author entitled Sweet Talk. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker numerous times over a twenty year period. I haven’t read any of the other stories, so this review only pertains to: Able, Barker, Charlie, Dog by Stephanie Vaughn. The story is spare and haunting, centering on the first person narrator’s perceptions of her father, as they changed over time. The title is derived from a trick to memorize the alphabet, that she learned at age twelve years, taught to her by her father, used by the military to keep the B’s separate from the V’s. Throughout the story, he (the father) teaches life lessons, he is a good man, while at the same time, that he is deeply flawed, as a human being. Thematically, this is Vaughn’s moral of the story: even at our best, we’re still capable of our worst.